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March 21st, 2010

All that jazz and...well..stuff. @ 09:43 am

saadiira:
Recently I was involved in something that made me think...what is the most important element to good gaming? What elements need to go along for you to actually be able to play?

Inquiring minds...

-Dira-
 
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From:claidheamhmor
Date:March 21st, 2010 02:46 pm (UTC)
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Consistency - in the way the rules are handled and in the game world.
Freedom to play my character myself (within the limit of the world and the rules).
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From:saadiira
Date:May 8th, 2010 09:00 am (UTC)
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YES! Oh my yes. Interference with either does lead to bad bad gaming...and good gaming involves what you've just said as vital components.
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From:evildmguy
Date:March 21st, 2010 05:31 pm (UTC)
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People at the table. I have a more remote group, via web cams and IM, than one at the table and it's amazing how much more fun it is, and easier in many ways, to game when people are at the table.

In doing remote gaming, I am finding that my style isn't to prep everything down to the minute details. I don't like to know exactly how things are going to go. Instead, I get an overall idea and a plotline of the bad guys and then go with the flow of the group and do what I can to make things dramatic and fun. Having a remote group has really taken me away from that and it's been hard.

Players and a GM who all have the same goal. Easy to say, hard to make sure it's happening. It's too easy to say "have fun" when everyone's idea of fun might not match up. It takes some work to make sure everyone is having fun at the table.

A good system to support the goals of the group. Games play differently and even though any game can be house rules to support a particular group's desires, most people myself included, don't have time to write up a system that does exactly what they need it to do. It takes time to really learn a system and then figure out if that system works best for the group.

I'm probably making this sound harder than it probably is because of some issues in my group but certainly, as with anything, these things can help.

edg
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From:saadiira
Date:May 8th, 2010 09:02 am (UTC)
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One of the things I miss about tabletop is that it took away that sense of anonymity so many bad gamers online hide behind. Yes, that's left of the point, but figured to comment...

Group dynamic can be so important.

-Dira-
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From:eruditeviking
Date:March 22nd, 2010 04:25 pm (UTC)
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Three major elements needed:

Consistency: Rules and Supplements*
Imagination: Players and GM
Dependability: Players and GM

I need all three to function in a good campaign. I hate having players flake out on games regularly, and I can't stand players who only hack'n'slash. Rules, as Claidheamhmor said must be handled with consistency in a fair and agreed upon manner.

*Before gaming commences I always inquire as to which books are "on the table" for use. As my preferred game has several hundred books available for everything from spells to classes and kits, it makes sense to determine which ones are in play before the game starts. That limits the number of rule foul-ups that occur.
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From:saadiira
Date:May 8th, 2010 09:05 am (UTC)
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Heh. ALL of them...except supplement #97. nods. Hack and slash alone can be fun, every now and then. But that's the limit on it. If there's no plot, no characterization,no real interaction beyond 'hi ho hi ho, it's off to maim and slay we go?' not enough.

Back when I tabletopped heavily, I also played the game of a thousand books and supplements...I'd hand out a little booklet of adapted rulings, though truth to tell, I did use a huge variety of books and modules, and and and...it worked decently, but I'd managed to put together some really good groups.

-Dira-